Eurowalks: mapping Scotland’s European identity

Wojtek the Polish “Soldier Bear” – Edinburgh EuroWalk

Scotland’s links with Europe go back at least a thousand years. Tom Devine, our premier historian, calls this rich history “a total meshed experience” and he, like us, sees Scotland as an outward-looking European nation with “wider and deeper” relations with mainland Europe than “insular” England.

That’s why we have chosen today, Europe Day, to launch Eurowalks, our latest campaign to celebrate and reaffirm Scotland’s European identity. It is just one element of a series of events on a special day of the year to proclaim membership of the European Union as Scotland’s destiny.

Opening of the Glasgow EuroWalk on 9 May 2021

Europe Day reminds us of the huge sacrifices made in the fight for liberation from fascism and war but also of the tremendous gains the EU embodies in terms of peace, prosperity and democracy. Our members and supporters will be paying tribute to this and to Scotland’s role in this history by joining together in walks up and down the country.

Walking the Glasgow EuroWalk

Each walk takes in visits to/stops at links ancient and modern between Scotland and mainland Europe such as cultural and educational institutions, literary and artistic individuals, historic events, prominent individuals and more. Some are already famous across the continent and/or the world; others are less well-known but no less deserving of exploration.

Initially, we have published details of walks in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Perth and St Andrews, with more coming in Dunfermline and Stirling – and a Glasgow Euro drive is there to follow. These fascinating immersions in history yesterday and today are not just for us but for all who come to Scotland from overseas, whether as residents or temporary visitors/tourists.

And there will be more to come. Indeed, if you have ideas about other sites and contributions to make, please get in touch with us at: walks4europe@gmail.com

Featured image of Burns Monument Edinburgh, a tribute to Scotland’s national and a great European poet via Kim Traynor (own work) CC BY-SA 3.0

And a couple of press clippings: